anchor cable ord duty flex

General Accessories Cord Anchor To Suit Ordinary Duty Flexible Cords

Catalogue Number: 569A
anchor cable ord duty flex
Colour:
Colour: Per UOM Std.
  • 1 PCE

Specifications

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Product brand
Clipsal
Sustainable offer status
Green Premium product
EU RoHS Directive
Compliant
Mercury free
Yes
RoHS exemption information
Yes
China RoHS Regulation
Product out of China RoHS scope. Substance declaration for your information
Environmental Disclosure
ENVPEP060307EN

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Frequently Asked Questions

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What are the 2 colour code standards supported on SENZ Data jacks

It is 568A and 568B

What is the suspension hook for the PDL 56 Series

You can use PDL56SHL - Suspension Hook (large) this is to fit the 56P and 56PA plugs and/or 56CR socket connectors.  

What is the conduit nut adaptor to suit the PDL 56 Series

Part number is PDL56AM40, for flexible conduit or hose.  Suits both 56P and 56PA and 56CR socket connectors.

What is the cut-out for the 56FA flush mount surround?

Solid and Cavity Brick Walls (Bracket Mounting)

Prepare wall by cutting hole 90 x 90mm for 56FA1, 90 x 190mm
for 56FA2, 90 x 285mm for 56FA3 and 190mm2 for 56FA4.
Mount bracket to exterior wall using any suitable fixing device i.e.
thrubolts, fibre plugs, etc.
Remove adhesive backing sheet from gasket and adhere to inner
surface of flange. Mount modules to bracket through flange.
Note: 1. For soft or porous brickwork we suggest adhesive
anchored fixing.
2. When mounting to brick ensure all mortar joints are
sealed with suitable caulking compound.

 

Panel Type Walls (Bracket Mounting)

Prepare wall by cutting hole as described above for solid and
cavity brick walls. Mount bracket to wall using suitable hollow wall
anchors. Adhere gasket to flange and mount modules through
flange to bracket.
Note: If possible mount bracket to building frame i.e. wooden
noggins and studs with suitable wood screws.

Are APC Cat 6 Patch Panels color coded for 568B or 568A?

Issue: 
The installer needs to know the color code on the rear of the Cat 6 patch panel.  
 
Product Line:
Cables and Connectivity Solutions, Patch Panels
 
Environment:
CAT6PNL-24, CAT6PNL-48
 
Cause:
Installers need to know if the patch panel has the color code they require.
 
Resolution : 
 
The CAT6PNL-xx series of Patch Panels have both 568B and 568A color codes. 

What is the part number for a patch panel, 24 port, CAT 6, loaded?

The part number is RJ6/24PP.
 Some of the key features are:
  •  Universal colour coding for 568A and 568B standards
  • Removable rear cable management tray
  • Individual removable modular jacks
  • ACMA compliant
  • Dielectric Strength: 1,000 V RmS at 60hz for 1 minute
  • Current Rating: 1.5 A
  • Insulation Resistance: 10 mohm
  • Temperature Range: -10 to 60 deg C
  • Material: Phosphor bronze
  • Standard: AS/NZS 3080:2003, ISO/IEC 11801 2002 and ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B 

 
For further information please visit https://www.clipsal.com/Trade/Products/ProductDetail?catno=RJ6/24PP 

How are the Color Codes 568A and 568B different?

Issue:
The difference between T568A and T568B color codes is needed.

Product Line:
Cables and Connectivity Solutions, Patch Panels

Environment:
CAT6PNL-24 and CAT6PNL-48, all serial ranges. 

Cause:
Not following the correct color code can cause wiring errors.

Answer: 
568A and 568B are color code standards that show which color wire matches up with a specific position on an RJ45 connector. When designing a network infrastructure only one color code can be followed. All commercial and residential wiring in the US follows TIA 568B color code. 

T568B Color Code
RJ45 Pin---Pair Color
1-------------White/Orange
2-------------Orange
3-------------White/Green
4-------------Blue
5-------------White/Blue
6-------------Green
7-------------White/Brown
8-------------Brown

T568A Color Code
RJ45 Pin---Pair Color
1-------------White/Green
2-------------Green
3-------------White/Orange
4-------------Blue
5-------------White/Blue
6-------------Orange
7-------------White/Brown
8-------------Brown

How do you read the color code on the IDC connectors of the Cat 6 Patch Panels?

Issue:
Customers may question which color code instructions to follow, 568B vs. 568A. Or they may not understand how to read the color code.

Product Line:
Cables and Connectivity Solutions, Cat 6 Patch Panels

Environment:
All versions and serial ranges.

Cause:
The color code instructions may be confusing.

Resolution:
For high speed networking 568B is used almost universally.
If you need help determining how to terminate to the 568B or 568A color code please see the attached file.
 

What is the part number of the flush surround to suit 56CV, one piece cover, switched outlets?

56FA2 is the part number of the flush surround to suit 56CV, one piece cover switched outlets. Surface mounted 56 Series Sockets, Switches and Combinations can be transformed into flush mounting equivalents using the 56FA Surrounds and Brackets. The surrounds can be used on various types of walls to ensure a neat installation, such as:
• a mounting enclosure (back box) in poured concrete
• a bracket on brick, brick veneer or panel walls.
The brackets provide the installer with a  practical method of flush mounting 56 Series accessories. Comprehensive installation instructions are supplied with all units.
56FA1, 56FA2, 56FA3 and 56FA4 Flush Surrounds contain a moulded flange, foam gasket and stainless steel mounting screws.
For further information, please visit https://www.clipsal.com/Trade/Products/ProductDetail?catno=56FA2

Xanbus cable information

There are a couple of types of "ethernet cables". Xanbus uses straight through. Here is information about the different types and how to distinguish between them. Using the wrong cable does not damage the inverter (RS/MS); they just don't work.

Crossover Cables vs Straight Through Cables

Ethernet patch cables can be wired in three different ways, the two main ways are called straight through and crossover. The third type is called rolled and has only specialized applications.

Generally speaking, straight through cables are used to patch between different types of equipment; for example, PCs to a hub.
Conversely, crossover cables are generally used to patch between similar types of equipment; a PC to another PC for example.
Some modern hubs don't care if you use crossover cables or straight through cables, they work out what you're using and configure themselves accordingly.

As stated at the outset, the actual difference is in the wiring. Inside the UTP patch cable there are 8 physical wires although the network only uses 4 of them (the other 4 are not used). The 8 wires are arranged in what's known as pairs and one pair is used to send information whilst the other pair is used to receive information.

On a PC, the pair on pins 1 and 2 of the connector send information, whilst the pair on pins 3 and 6 receive the information. To make PCs talk to each we therefore need to connect the send pair of one PC to the receive pair of the other PC (and vice-versa). That means we need a crossover cable. If we used a straight through cable the both be listening on the one pair - and hearing nothing, and sending on the one pair - achieving nothing.

Electrically, the straight through and crossover cables look like the diagram below: The most common cable is the straight through cable. In a home or small office network you might only have one crossover cable used - perhaps from the cable or DSL modem to the distribution hub. How do you tell what sort of cable you have in your hand? You can tell by looking at the connectors, identifying the wiring from its colors, and comparing the ends. See the next question on color codes.

Color Codes

The standards say that Ethernet connectors should be cabled with specific colors on specific pins. There are two standard layouts - if a cable has the same layout on both ends it's a straight through cable. If a cable has one layout on one end and the other layout on the other end then it's a crossover cable. Whilst not universal, the color codes shown below are generally used on professional cables.

If a cable has 568A color wiring on both ends then it's a straight through cable.

If a cable has 568B color wiring on both ends then it's also a straight through cable.

If a cable has 568A color wiring on one end and 568B color coded wiring on the other end, then it's a crossover cable.

In fact, while the colors are standardized and usually followed, that's not the important part. What's more important is that one "pair" (wires that are twisted together inside the cable sheath) is used for the transmit side and another pair for the receive side. If pairs aren't used then it's likely your cable will not work. Pairs are identified by the colors. The orange wire and the orange with white stripe (or sometimes white with orange stripe) wire are a pair. The brown wire and the brown with white stripe wire are a pair. Etc.