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plate only 3gang arch

Catalogue Number: 33

Flush Plate, 3 Gang, Architrave

plate only 3gang arch
Colour: White Electric
Colour: Per UOM Std.
  • Black 1 PCE
  • Cream 1 PCE
  • White Electric 1 PCE
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Key Features & Specifications

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  • Architrave flush switch
  • Flush mount
  • For termination of unused or looped cables, mounting of custom equipment or simply blanking off unused openings in wall/wall cladding
Range of product
Standard Series
Product brand
Clipsal
Number of gangs
3 gangs
Product destination
switch
Fixing mode
by screws
Material
plastic
Marking
without marking
Mounting position
horizontal and vertical
Fixing center
97 mm
Length
112 mm
Width
32 mm
Depth
11 mm
REACh Regulation
Reference contains Substances of Very High Concern above the threshold
EU RoHS Directive
Compliant
Mercury free
Yes
RoHS exemption information
Yes
China RoHS Regulation
Product out of China RoHS scope. Substance declaration for your information
Circularity Profile
N/A

Documents & downloads

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  • Technical Data Catalogues

Frequently Asked Questions

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What is the 600 series 3 gang switch that the switches are in a pyramid configuration?

That is the PDL683VWP, Waterproof switchplate (IP56)
They can be found on page 33 of the 2014 PDL Pocketbook.

Why is my Conext CL showing an alarm code: 32 & 33 - AC temp snsr flt & DC temp snsr flt ( AC and DC Temp Sensor Fault Service Alarm)

Issue: 
Customer is calling to confirm alarm code: 32 & 33 ( AC temp snsr flt Service)

Product Line: 
Conext CL 18000NA Conext CL 25000NA Conext CL 20000E Conext CL 25000E

Environment:  
On site troubleshooting
 
Cause:
Abnormal ambient temp
Cooling problem
Detection circuit malfunction

Resolution: 
Check fans, installation conditions, air inlet and outlet
Check Internal temperature displays in STATUS screen
Turn off and on AC breaker
If failure persists, replace the unit

What is the server/client side requirement of Citect Anywhere?

Server-side requirements:-

• Windows Server OS
• Microsoft Remote Desktop Services (RDS) CALs
• Vijeo Citect / CitectSCADA v7.20 (SP5) and above
• Citect Control/View Only Client licenses
• Citect Anywhere licenses 

Client-side requirements:- 

Any operating system with the HTML5-capable browser
  • Internet Explorer® 10 or higher
  • Safari® 8 or higher
  • Chrome™ 33 or higher
  • Microsoft® Edge

Why does ATS48 not operate when wired like the recommended diagram on page 74 of the June 2002 manual?

The user's manual recommended diagram on page 74 is incorrect for proper operation.  
On line 2 of the ladder diagram after fault relay R1A to R1C connection the coil that is labeled TR for trip relay should be a FR coil for fault relay.
Then should add a line after this that has a NC (normally closed ) FR ( fault relay ) contact in series with a TR ( trip relay ) coil.

This configuration would then allow proper operation of unit.

What is the part # for a clear plastic bezel for a ZB4BW31, ZB4BW32, ZB4BW33 ZB4BW34, ZB4BW35, ZB4BW36, ZB4BW37 ?

Issue:
What is the part # for a clear plastic bezel for a ZB4 illuminated push buttons (incandescent type)?

Product Line:
Product selection

Environment:
All Products

Cause:
Product selection

Resolution:
Use a W415595280111
 

Does an EGX100 or EGX300 have a fiber optic connection port?

Issue:
A user would like to connect to an EGX gateway via a fiber optic connection.
 
Product Line:
EGX100
EGX300
 
Cause:
A user requires a fiber optic connection to the EGX gateway.
 
Resolution:
The EGX100 and EGX300 gateways do not have an on board fiber optic port therefore a direct fiber optic connection to the gateway is not possible.

Alternate Option: 
A user can purchase and EGX in a Factory Assembled enclosure that contains a (4-Copper & 1-Fiber) Ethernet switch. The enclosure can be purchased for indoor or outdoor use.
 
Please reference page 33 of the attached factory assembled enclosure selection guide for part numbers. 

What is the Modbus cycle time on the ATV31 and ATV71?

Issue:   ATV31 and ATV71, I would like to know the cycle time of ATV31 and 71 that can respond to next new Modbus request.
 
Product Line:   ATV31 ATv71
 
Environment:  All using Modbus
 
Cause:   Modbus cycle time
 
Resolution:   
This answer time depends on the baud rate and the number of words transmitted.

For ATV31, for reading 1 word, it is necessary to count 15 to 20 ms between the end of the question and the start of the answer. It is necessary to add the moving time of the information which depends on the baud rate. For a speed of 19200 bauds, this moving time is about 33 ms.
For reading 25 words, we can count 28 to 33 ms and add the moving time.

Regarding ATV71, it is about 30 ms for an answer of reading 1 word with a baud rate of 19200.
Pay attention because it is an empirical measure which we made with a soft of test modbus.If you add 1 or 2 option boards, this time will increase.
The important is to know that this time is lower than 100 ms.

If you need a more precise answer delay, it's better to use another protocol of communication like Ethernet for example.


Question 1 - I want to perfom +/- speed with ATV31 via keys on display, and there are some points to confirm. Page 33 ( Complete Manual_EN )-> Show us...

Goals and Symptoms

Question 1 - I want to perfom +/- speed with ATV31 via keys on display, and there are some points to confirm. Page 33 ( Complete Manual_EN )-> Show us that we can get access to UPdt and UPdH sub-parameters on the Fr1 or Fr2 parameters, but I do not have access on Fr1 parameter to these sub-parameters, just Fr2. Is it correct? Question 2 After doing the program ( +/- speed) we must go to Display Menu, rFr paramenter that allows to change the reference and speed. The problem is when I power-off the drive and power-up again, even lock the Display menu at rFr parameter, I must return to display menu and rFr parameter to do same procedure. Is it correct? I have an OEM that dont want to do these procedure after doing all programs in their machines. Best regards

Facts and Changes

ATV31

Causes and Fixes

Question 1:

It's possibe to have UPdt and UPdH on FR1 if you disable the sum function on AI2 and AI3 ( page 42 of programming manual ).

Question 2:

It's correct but not simple to use it and not normal. It must possible th have +/- speed without SUP menu access. Corrective action transmit for software evolution.


Legacy KB System (APS) Data: RESL161392 V1.0, Originally authored by on , Last Edited by on
Related ranges: Altivar 31

Why are 9001KM38 listed twice, as resistor and full voltage light modules?

Issue:
Is the 9001KM38 a resistor type or full voltage type of light module?

Product Line:
Harmony Pushbuttons

Environment:
All Products

Cause:
Product Features

Resolution:
Both descriptions are accurate. They are both the same device but can be selected by either description depending on the application/preference.

Is There a lens avaliable for XUY40327350?

XUY40327350 is a high temperature fiber specially manufactured for one of our customer (exclusive sales), so to get this product or informations about it, you have to contact directly the company : we are not authorized to provide any information about this product.

For further information please visit https://www.schneider-electric.com.au

What is the power rating differences between the 8660 Alphapak and the 8660 SSRVS style starters?

Issue: What is the power rating differences between the 8660 Alphapak and the 8660 SSRVS style starters?
 
Product Line: 8660 AlphaPak starters
 
Environment: All
 
Cause:N/A
 
Resolution:
The currect rating abbreviations were:
Alphapak`s SSRVS`s
MD (16 amps) MG (120 amps)
ME (32 amps) MH (200 amps)
MF (64 amps) MJ (320 amps)
MG (128 amps) MK (500 amps)
MM (750 amps).


They voltage codes were:
Alphapak`s SSRVS`s
23 (208 / 230 volts) 11 (200 volts)
46 (380 / 460 volts) 22 (230 /460 volts)
57 (500 / 575 volts) 33 (500 / 575 volts).  NOTE The 8660 AlphaPak SSRVS are obsolete.  Parts, Service, or Support are no longer available.

 

What are the Contact Resistance values for the LF range MV Circuit Breaker.

The contact resistance values for the LF range MV Circuit Breaker are tabulated below :

 
LF LF1 LF2 LF3

Fixed

Withdrawable

Fixed

Withdrawable

Fixed

Withdrawable

Contact Resistance

current supplied : I = 100 A

< 33 µΩ < 50 µΩ < 37 µΩ < 45 µΩ < 14 µΩ < 26 µΩ

What are some features I need to be aware of while manipulating the config.ini file of a APC Network Management Card?


Issue

What are some features I need to be aware of while manipulating the config.ini file of a APC Network Management Card?
 


Product Line
 
  • Network Management Card 1 (NMC1) - AP9617, AP9618, AP9619
Devices with an embedded Network Management Card 1 include (but are not limited to): Metered/Switched Rack PDUs (AP78XX, AP79XX), Rack Automatic Transfer Switches (AP77XX, Environmental Monitoring Units (AP9320, AP9340, Netbotz 200)
  • Network Management Card 2 (NMC2) - AP9630/AP9630CH, AP9631/AP9631CH, AP9635/AP9635CH
Devices with an embedded Network Management Card 2 include (but are not limited to): 2G Metered/Switched Rack PDUs (AP84XX, AP86XX, AP88XX, AP89XX), Certain Audio/Video Network Management Enabled products.
 


Environment
 
  • All serial numbers
  • Firmware versions v3.X.X and higher

Cause

The config.ini file on every network management card can be downloaded using command line FTP or SCP. It is a current snapshot of what is running in the Network Management Card's flash memory.

You can make minor changes to the config file and put the file back on the card to make changes to the options on the network card or unit it is installed in. This is useful for configuring multiple units with similar settings.


Resolution

The purpose of the override keyword is to prevent a user from accidentally setting many cards to the same IP settings, thus causing IP conflicts on the network. The override keyword is located in the NetworkTCP/IP section, for example:
[NetworkTCP/IP]
Override=00 C0 B7 6A 33 56
SystemIP=159.215.xxx.xxx
SubnetMask=255.255.255.0
DefaultGateway=159.215.xxx.xxx
BootMode=Manual

When putting the config.ini file back on a network card, the override keyword MUST match the MAC address of the card for the four settings listed above to apply. They will be ignored if the override and MAC do not match.

On certain types of devices such as UPSs, there is a similar override mechanism to protect certain values. In this instance, you'll find a keyword called UPSOverride under the UPS device settings section (ex. [SmartUPS/Matrix]) and it will look similar to this at the top of the specific section with UPS values and UPSOverride:
 
[SmartUPS/Matrix]
UPSName=APC_UPS
UPSOverride="IS1314000000"
RatedOutputVoltage=230
OutputUpperVoltage=253
OutputLowerVoltage=207
Sensitivity=Normal

UPSOverride must equal or have a value of the serial number of the UPS in which the Network Management Card in this example, which is where this setting would be applied.

On newer generation Micro-link UPS devices, such as SMX, SMT, SRT, and SURTD the following keywords in config.ini are protected by UPSOverride:
  • RatedOutputVoltage
  • OutputFrequencyRange

On older generation devices, the following are protected by UPSOverride:
  • RatedOutputVoltage

These values are protected to avoid accidently setting the same potentially "site specific" settings to multiple UPSs without extra care, just as with the TCP/IP settings.

For more details on UPS "generations," refer to knowledge base FA230533.

For more information on mass configuration, please see knowledge base FA156117.

 

How to read alarm status's via registers on a CM3000/CM4000 series meter

Issue
Reading alarm registers

Product Line
CM3000
CM4000

Environment
Alarming

Resolution
Register 10011 - 10022 (12) contain the active alarm status for all alarms in a Series 4000 or 3000 Circuit Monitor (CM3, CM4). The least significant register is 10022 and 10011 is the most significant register. Therefore, register 10022 contain the status of the first 16 alarms. In binary, the least significant bit (referred to as bit 00) to the right of the register represents alarm 1, bit 01 = alarm 2, bit 02 = alarm 3, and ...........

1 = alarm is active
0 = alarm is inactive

Example:.
Alarm 2 and 4 are active (bits 01 and 03)
register 10022 reads 0000000000001010 in binary


Alarm Description
01 Over Current Phase A Over Ia 
02 Over Current Phase B Over Ib 
03 Over Current Phase C Over Ic 
04 Over Current Neutral Over In 
05 Over Current Ground Over Ig 
06 Under Current Phase A Under Ia 
07 Under Current Phase B Under Ib 
08 Under Current Phase C Under Ic 
09 Current Unbalance, Max I Unbal Max 
10 Current Loss Current Loss 
11 Over Voltage Phase AN Over Van 
12 Over Voltage Phase BN Over Vbn 
13 Over Voltage Phase CN Over Vcn 
14 Over Voltage Phase AB Over Vab 
15 Over Voltage Phase BC Over Vbc 
16 Over Voltage Phase CA Over Vca 
17 Under Voltage Phase A Under Van 
18 Under Voltage Phase B Under Vbn 
19 Under Voltage Phase C Under Vcn 
20 Under Voltage Phase AB Under Vab 
21 Under Voltage Phase BC Under Vbc 
22 Under Voltage Phase CA Under Vca 
23 Voltage Unbalance LN, Max V Unbal L-N Max 
24 Voltage Unbalance LL, Max V Unbal L-L Max 
25 Voltage Loss (loss of A,B,C, but not all) Voltage Loss 
26 Phase Reversal Phase Rev 
27 Over kVA Demand Over kVA Dmd 
28 Over kW Demand Over kW Dmd 
29 Over kVAR Demand Over kVAR Dmd 
30 Over Frequency Over Freq 
31 Under Frequency Under Freq 
32 Lagging true power factor Lag True PF 
33 Leading true power factor Lead True PF 
34 Lagging displacement power factor Lag Disp PF 
35 Leading displacement power factor Lead Disp PF 
36 Over Current Demand Phase A Over Ia Dmd 
37 Over Current Demand Phase B Over Ib Dmd 
38 Over Current Demand Phase C Over Ic Dmd 
39 Over THD Voltage AN Over THD Van 
40 Over THD Voltage BN Over THD Vbn 
41 Over THD Voltage CN Over THD Vcn 
42 Over THD Voltage AB Over THD Vab 
43 Over THD Voltage BC Over THD Vbc 
44 Over THD Voltage CA Over THD Vca 
45-80 Reserved for custom alarms.

 

BMS AP9921X-AP9922 Battery Management System; high battery voltages on 40 Jar battery applications

 
 
Issue:
Battery Management System; high battery voltages on 40 Jar battery applications
 
 
Product line:
AP9921X-AP9922 Battery Management System installed on a 40 Jar battery applications
 

Environment:
All models, all serial numbers
 

Cause:
In applications where you have AP9921X-AP9922 Battery Management System (BMS) installed on a 40 Jar battery solution; such as we see on MGE UPS battery systems, it’s possible to see high voltages on one or more B side batteries. The voltages will typically be found higher than 13.5vdc and the BMS unit may be in alarm, Battery High User Defined Voltage, Battery High Chemistry Voltage alarm may exist.
 
Connector 35 is the negative side of the battery string voltage to the BMS power supply.
 

Resolution:
First check the BMS “A” side harness wiring for incorrectly terminated #35 wire to battery 32 negative post instead of the last battery 40 negative terminal. This miss wire may result in some batteries with high voltages on the “B” side connector. If this is a 40 jar battery string, please be sure that you have BMS “A” side #35 wire terminated at Battery jar 40 negative terminal.
 
Please find wiring example below for 40 Jar battery string:
 
Connector A - Wire 1 = Positive Terminal Battery 1
Connector A - Wire 34 = Positive Terminal Battery 1
Connector A - Wire 2 = Positive Terminal Battery 2
Connector A - Wire 3 = Positive Terminal Battery 3
...continues…
Connector A - Wire 32 = Positive Terminal Battery 32
Connector A - Wire 33 = Negative Terminal Battery 32
 
Connector B - Wire 1 = Positive Terminal Battery 33
Connector B - Wire 2 = Positive Terminal Battery 34
Connector B - Wire 3 = Positive Terminal Battery 35
...continues…
Connector B - Wire 8 = Positive Terminal Battery 40
Connector B - Wire 9 = Negative Terminal Battery 40
Connector A - Wire 35 = Negative Terminal Battery 40
 
If the BMS harness is not miss wired then proceed with testing of the battery (s) and wiring, replace any battery that doesn’t pass the cell recorder test. If a specific battery causes repeated alarms (especially if the voltage continues to increase), the battery is failing.
 

 

How to read alarm status's via registers on a CM2000 series meter

The alarm status's are stored in registers 5771-5778 with each alarm set to a bit indexed from zero. For example, if one needed to determine if the over current alarm for phase A was active you would read register 5771 and look to bit zero. If the register reading program is not capable of displaying binary (bit level) information, the information may be entered into the Windows calculator and converted from decimal to binary.
Alarm No. Alarm Description
01 Over Current Phase A
02 Over Current Phase B
03 Over Current Phase C
04 Over Current Neutral
05 Over Current Ground
06 Under Current Phase A
07 Under Current Phase B
08 Under Current Phase C
09 Current Unbalance Phase A
10 Current Unbalance Phase B
11 Current Unbalance Phase C
12 Phase Loss, Current
13 Over Voltage Phase A
14 Over Voltage Phase B
15 Over Voltage Phase C
16 Over Voltage Phase A-B
17 Over Voltage Phase B-C
18 Over Voltage Phase C-A
19 Under Voltage Phase A
20 Under Voltage Phase B
21 Under Voltage Phase C
22 Under Voltage Phase A-B
23 Under Voltage Phase B-C
24 Under Voltage Phase C-A
25 Voltage Unbalance A
26 Voltage Unbalance B
27 Voltage Unbalance C
28 Voltage Unbalance A-B
29 Voltage Unbalance B-C
30 Voltage Unbalance C-A
31 Voltage Loss (Loss of A, B, or C, but not all)
32 Over kVA 3-Phase Total
33 Over KW Into the Load 3-Phase Total
34 Over KW Out of the Load 3-Phase Total
35 Over kVAR Into the Load 3-Phase Total
36 Over kVAR Out of the Load 3-Phase Total
37 Over Current Demand Phase A
38 Over Current Demand Phase B
39 Over Current Demand Phase C
40 Over Current Demand 3-phase Total
41 Over Frequency
42 Under Frequency
43 Lagging True Power Factor
44 Leading True Power Factor
45 Lagging Displacement Power Factor
46 Leading Displacement Power Factor
47 Suspended Sag/Swell
49 Over Value THD Current Phase A
50 Over Value THD Current Phase B
51 Over Value THD Current Phase C
52 Over Value THD Voltage Phase A-N
53 Over Value THD Voltage Phase B-N
54 Over Value THD Voltage Phase C-N
55 Over Value THD Voltage Phase A-B
56 Over Value THD Voltage Phase B-C
57 Over Value THD Voltage Phase C-A
58 Over K-Factor Phase A 1071 Tenths % A
59 Over K-Factor Phase B 1072 Tenths % A
60 Over K-Factor Phase C
61 Over Predicted kVA Demand
62 Over Predicted KW Demand
63 Over Predicted kVAR Demand
64 Over kVA Demand Level 1
65 Over kVA Demand Level 2
66 Over kVA Demand Level 3
67 Over kW Demand Level 1
68 Over KW Demand Level 2
69 Over KW Demand Level 3
70 Over kVAR Demand
71 Over Lagging 3-phase Avg. Power Factor
72 Under 3-Phase Total Real Power
73 Over Reverse 3-Phase Power
74 Phase Reversal
75 Status Input 1 Transition from Off to On
76 Status Input 2 Transition from Off to On
77 Status Input 3 Transition from Off to On
78 Status Input 4 Transition from Off to On
79 Status Input 5 Transition from Off to On
80 Status Input 6 Transition from Off to On
81 Status Input 7 Transition from Off to On
82 Status Input 8 Transition from Off to On
83 Status Input 1 Transition from On to Off
84 Status Input 2 Transition from On to Off
85 Status Input 3 Transition from On to Off
86 Status Input 4 Transition from On to Off
87 Status Input 5 Transition from On to Off
88 Status Input 6 Transition from On to Off
89 Status Input 7 Transition from On to Off
90 Status Input 8 Transition from On to Off
99 End of Incremental Energy Interval
100 Power-Up/Reset
101 End of Demand Interval
102 End of Update Cycle
103 Over Analog Input Channel 1
104 Over Analog Input Channel 2
105 Over Analog Input Channel 3
106 Over Analog Input Channel 4
107 Under Analog Input Channel 1
108 Under Analog Input Channel 2
109 Under Analog Input Channel 3
110 Under Analog Input Channel 4
201 Voltage Swell A-N/A-B
202 Voltage Swell B-N
203 Voltage Swell C-N/C-B
204 Current Swell Phase A
205 Current Swell Phase B
206 Current Swell Phase C
207 Current Swell Neutral
208 Voltage Sag A-N/A-B
209 Voltage Sag B-N
210 Voltage Sag C-N/C-B
211 Current Sag Phase A
212 Current Sag Phase B
213 Current Sag Phase C
214 Current Sag Neutral


Legacy KB System (APS) Data: RESL209554 V1.0, Originally authored by MaTh on 11/02/2012, Last Edited by MaTh on 11/02/2012
Related ranges: CM2000 series

How to replace the obsolete limit switches XCMA1524569 and XCMA1524570?

Please note that the XCMA1524569 and XCMA1524570 specific switches are discontinued since 2005.
Both references are in fact XCMA102 limit switch (see attached picture) with adapted cable length
- XCMA1524569 = cable length of 33 cm (centimetre),
- XCMA1524570 = cable length of 63.5 cm.
Substitution by the standard XCMD2102L1 limit switch with 1m cable length.

Video: How can I download Event, Data, Configuration, and Debug files from my Network Management Card?


Issue
  1. Technical Support has requested log files for review
  2. The user wishes to view available log files
  3. The user would like to back up one or more files.

Product Line
 
  • Web/SNMP Card - AP9606
Devices with an embedded Web/SNMP Card include (but are not limited to): Environmental Monitoring Unit 1 (AP9312TH)
  • Network Management Card 1 (NMC1) - AP9617, AP9618, AP9619
Devices with an embedded Network Management Card 1 include (but are not limited to): Metered/Switched Rack PDUs (AP78XX, AP79XX), Rack Automatic Transfer Switches (AP77XX, Environmental Monitoring Units (AP9320, AP9340, Netbotz 200)
  • Network Management Card 2 (NMC2) - AP9630/AP9630CH, AP9631/AP9631CH, AP9635/AP9635CH
Devices with an embedded Network Management Card 2 include (but are not limited to): 2G Metered/Switched Rack PDUs (AP84XX, AP86XX, AP88XX, AP89XX), Rack Automatic Transfer Switches (AP44XX), Certain Audio/Video Network Management Enabled products, Smart-UPS Online (SRT).

Environment
  • All serial numbers
  • All firmware versions (unless otherwise noted)


Cause

You can download Event and Data logs from a Network Management Card (NMC) as well as any configuration files directly from the Network Management Card. This is helpful in situations that require backup of data and/or settings or when troubleshooting. In certain situations, additional debug files may be requested. This is typically done using the FTP protocol but other options exist depending on your device type and current configuration.


Resolution

Refer to the instructions below which cover FTP or SCP, download via web interface (if available), and via the Command Line Interface (CLI) (if available).

To begin, here is a list of what files are available from each card:
 
  • Web/SNMP Card (AP9606)
    • Available file includes: event.txt
  • Network Management Card 1 (AP9617, AP9618, AP9619)
    • Available files include: event.txt, data.txt, and config.ini
 
  • Network Management Card 2 (AP9630, AP9631, AP9635)
    • Available files include: event.txt, data.txt, config.ini, debug.txt, dump.txt, select UPS debug files (v6.0.6 and higher only)

File Transfer Protocol - All Network Management Cards or Web/SNMP Card


Please follow the procedure below for FTP instructions on v3.X.X, v5.X.X, and v6.X.X firmware versions. These same steps could also be used for SCP in some form.
 

1.) Open a command prompt (In a Windows environment: Start > run > "cmd") or other client that supports the FTP protocol.

2.) Change directories to the directory that you want the files stored in. Generally you'd use the cd command in most command line tools. If using a GUI FTP client, this may not be necessary.

3.) Type ftp<space><IP address of Network Management Card>. Press enter.

4.) Log into the Network Management Card with an Administrator login.

5.) Type bin. Press enter. (This will change into binary transfer mode, as opposed to ASCII.)

6.) Type hash. Press enter. (This will display hash marks - # - on the screen to indicate data transfer).

7.) At your command prompt, type get config.ini. Press enter.

8.) *If using Network Management Card 2 only, files are now stored in the /logs directory on the card. Even so, backwards compatibility is built in so that these files can be retrieved from the root directory. Alternatively, you can also change to the logs directory to get the files. To do so, type cd logs.

9.) Type get<space>data.txt. Press enter.

10.) Type get<space>event.txt. Press enter.

11.) Optional: If requested to do so, change to the /dbg directory by typing cd<space>/dbg and type get<space>debug.txt and/or get<space>dump.txt.

12.) The files have now been downloaded and are saved to the directory that was specified in step 2.

13.) Type bye and exit out of your command prompt or FTP client.
 



Network Management Card 2 (AP9630/31/35) Only - v6.0.6 and higher - How to Export Logs (data.txt, event.txt, or config.ini only) via the web interface


Alternatively, if files are requested by technical support, a single debug file download, including event.txt and data.txt with many other files can be obtained via the web interface under About->Support->Generate Logs and subsequently Download logs. This same generation/download can be completed via the logzip CLI command and then FTP/SCP to download the single file from the /dbg directory.

 


 




Proceed below if only event.txt, data.txt, and config.ini are required.

1.) Log into the Network Management Card via a supported web browser.

2.) Navigate to the Logs menu and choose either Data->Log or Event->Log.

3.) Select the floppy disk icon, as shown below and you can export either data.txt or event.txt directly from the web interface to your local computer from the disk icon in their respective menus.




4.) Choose a location on your local computer to save the file with the dialog box that pops up.




5.) For config.ini, you navigate to Configuration->General->User Config File and select the download button, shown below.






After selecting Download, a dialog box should appear for you to save your file to your local computer.





 

Network Management Card 2 (AP9630/31/35) Only - v6.0.6 and higher - How to Export "Debug File Download" via Command Line Interface (CLI)


These steps are helpful if web access is unavailable or allowed.
 

1.) Connect to the Network Management Card 2 via the CLI (telnet, SSH, or local console).

2.) Issue the logzip command. During this process, the Network Management Card will generate a file called debug_<serial number of card>.tar. 
 

Example:

apc>logzip
Generating files
Compressing files into /dbg/debug_ZA123456789.tar
E000: Success
 

3.) Now the .tar file needs to be retrieved. Connect to the card via FTP or Secure CoPy. Log in via your preferred method and verify the file is is present in the /dbg directory.

 

Example (via FTP)

220 AP8841 Network Management Card AOS v6.1.3 FTP server ready.
User (10.10.10.96:(none)): apc
331 User name okay, need password.
Password: <hidden>
230 User logged in, proceed.
ftp> bin
200 TYPE Command okay.
ftp> hash
Hash mark printing On  ftp: (2048 bytes/hash mark) .
ftp> cd /dbg
250 CWD  requested file action okay, completed.
ftp> ls
200 PORT Command okay.
150 File status okay; about to open data connection.
./
../
debug_ZA123456789.tar
226 Closing data connection.
ftp: 33 bytes received in 0.00Seconds 16.50Kbytes/sec.

After verifying the file is present, download it. Change your local directory prior, if necessary. (This can be done by using the LCD ftp command.)

ftp>get <space>debug_ZA123456789.tar
150 File status okay; about to open data connection.
226 Closing data connection.
ftp: 2048 bytes received in 2.31 Seconds 16.50Kbytes/sec.

 

4.) Locate the file for storage or to provide to technical support.