Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V

Mech LED power available green 24V

Catalogue Number: 40N24
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Mech LED Power Available Red 24V
Mech LED Power Available Green 24V
Colour: Red
Colour: Per UOM Std.
  • Green 1 PCE
  • Red 1 PCE
Added to cart

Specifications

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Range
Pro Series
Product or component type
indicator module
Device presentation
mechanism with central plate
Type of packing
polybag
Device mounting
clip with locking bar
[Ue] rated operational voltage
24 V
Surface treatment
untreated
Local signalling
LED red for status
Material
  • PC (polycarbonate): housing
  • PA66: housing
    • Height
      23 mm
      Width
      23 mm
      Depth
      32 mm
      Net weight
      0.016 kg

      Documents & downloads

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      Frequently Asked Questions

      hide show

      Is 30N24 ,AC or DC rated??

      They do both AC and DC.

      Is the Clipsal 30N 24v DC

      Yes the 30N24 is suitable for AC and DC loads

      What will make up a double pole/double throw switch with a 24V Neon indicator in a plate

       Part codes you need  30MD2 + 30N24 + C2032VH

      Is the Indicator neon mechanism 30N24 DC compatible ?

      Yes, the 30N series can be used on either AC or DC voltages.

      Need a socket for a 409/4 - Electric Clock Connection Accessories, Clock Point Plug 250V 5A

       Use a 408/4 - Unswitched Socket, Electric Clock Connection Accessories, Clock Point Recessed Socket 250V 5A - 4 pin.

      Which RS-232 cable is used for communication from PC to SCADAPack 4000 series Transmitters?

      Schneider Electric 3-wire serial cable p/n TBUM297801 is used to connect from an 3-pin based RS-232 port on the SCADAPack 4000 series Transmitter (4012, 4032, 4102, 4203DR, 4203DS) to DE-9P connector on a DTE such as a PC.

      Will the XW Config tool work on my Windows 8 computer?

      Yes. The XW Config Tool will work on a Windows 8 operating system provided you use the attached multi-driver and CnxtCfgTool software.  

      What are the default charger settings for a Conext SW?

      What are the default charger settings for a Conext SW?



      SW 2524 120/240 

      Batt Type - Flooded
      Batt Capacity - 250Ah
      Max Chg Rate - 100%
      Charge Cycle - 3stage
      ReCharge Volts - 25.0V
      AC In Breaker - 30A
      Low Batt Cut Out - 21.0V


      SW 4024 120/240 

      Batt Type - Flooded
      Batt Capacity - 440Ah
      Max Chg Rate - 100%
      Charge Cycle - 3stage
      ReCharge Volts - 25.0V
      AC In Breaker - 30A
      Low Batt Cut Out - 21.0V
       

      When the Conext SW is in passthrough, what is the units output voltage?

      Customers want to confirm when the Conext SW is in passthrough, what is the units output voltage when using a 120v (Mono Phase) AC source? 

      When the unit is in passthrough using a 120V source, the output will be 120V/240V.

       

      What is the part code for a chassis that can take a INS100/160 and 72way.

       The part code is PAN24

      XW sell setup checklist w/MPPT 60/80.

      Issue:

      Checklist for setting up an XW system for sell. See XW operation manual for full full details.

      Environment:
       
      XW 4024 or XW 4548 or XW 6048 with f/w revisions 1.05 and above. MPPT60 or 80 charge controller. SCP 

      Resolution:

      1) Enable Grid support in XW setup menu
      2) Set Grid support voltage to 64V and enable SELL in XW advanced - grid support menu
      3) Verify CHARGE CYCLE is '2stgnofloat' in XW advanced - charger settings - charge cycle (factory default setting)
      4) On MPPT set CHARGE CYCLE to '3 stage' in MPPT advanced - charger settings - charge cycle 
      5) Is also recomended that the system has 100Ah for every KW of power that the customer wants to sell

      Cause:

      n/a

      Conext SW - Installation/ Wiring issue.

      Issue:

      Customer is installing the Conext SW and wants to confirm the wiring of the AC and DC cabling. 

      Environment:

      Conext SW 2524 120/240 Split-phase (865-2524)
       
      Conext SW 4024 120/240 Split-phase (865-4024)


      Resolution:
       

      See the attached wiring diagrams for the Conext SW and Conext SW-NA.
      Do not mix AC and DC wiring in the same conduit or panel. Consult the applicable installation code for details.
      There are two dual 3/4" /1" trade-size knockouts on the side panel and another two on the bottom panel for AC wiring. Use the same trade size of strain relief as the trade size of the knockout(s) you are using.

       

      How much heat is generated by my Conext system?

      Issue:
      Questions about how much heat each part of a Conext system uses.

      Product Line:
      Conext Battery Based Inverters
      Conext MPPT Solar Charge Controllers

      Environment:
      Battery based inverter in an enclosed environment.

      Cause:
      Proper system design needs to account for system cooling.

      Resolution:
      The power in BTUs per hour (BTU/hr) is equal to 3.412141633 times the power in watts (W):
      P(BTU/hr) = 3.412141633 × P(W)

      The efficiency and load of each unit can be used to calculate power loss in watts and then the above formula can be used to convert to BTU/hr.

      Conext XW+ 6848
      Load (W) Efficiency Loss (W) Heat (BTU/hr)
      6800 87% 884 3016
      3000 94% 180 614
      1500 95% 75 256

      Conext SW 4024 NA
      92% efficient at 4000W = 320W losses = 1092 BTU/hr

      Conext MPPT 60 150
      98% efficient at 48V battery at 3500W = 70W losses = 239 BTU/hr

      Conext MPPT 80 600
      96% efficient at 48V battery at 4800W = 192W losses = 655 BTU/hr
       

      What is the screw size for the cover on a 9001TY1?

      Issue:
      What is the screw size for the cover on a 9001TY1?

      Product Line:
      Control stations

      Environment:
      NEMA 1, 4, 12

      Cause:
      Not specified in the product catalog

      Resolution:
      The screw size is 10-24 x 1 3/8

      Does Schneider Electric offer tamper proof screws for a 9001KY1?

      Issue:
      Does Schneider Electric offer tamper proof screws for a 9001KY1?

      Product Line:
      Control Stations

      Environment:
      NEMA 1, 12
      IP55, 65

      Cause:
      Vandalism concerns

      Resolution:
      Screw size is 10-24 X 1 3/8. We do not offer any tamperproof screws.

      Can I poll 6 Digit Modbus registers with Telepace Studio?

      The MSTR and MSIP use a block of registers to store their configurations.

      If the MSTR block uses register 41001 in the SCADAPack as it's configuration start register, then :

      41001 = Comm port number

      41002 = function code

      41003 = slave controller address

      41004 = slave register address

      41005 = master register address

      41006 = length

      41007 = time out in 0.1s increments

      Trying to configure the MSTR block in Telepace prevents you from putting in a slave register address greater than 49999.

      Using a PUTU block, you can put an unsigned integer in the range 40001-65535 into register 41004 to indicate the slave register address. It appears as though the program will take the value in register 40004 and subtract 40001 to determine the holding register offset that gets sent in the actual modbus message.

      For example, using PUTU to put a value of 50010 into register 40004 would then cause the MSTR block to poll for a holding register with an offset of 10009 in the message which would correspond with a 6 digit address of register 410010.

      The largest unsigned integer you could put into register 40004 would be 65535, which would correspond with a 6-digit modbus holding register of 425535.



       

      Where can I get support for APC and MGE Products?

      For support on APC and MGE products please visit:  https://www.apc.com/support/

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      Do I need to use the stacking port when stacking two of the Conext SW?

      Issue:
      Do I need to use the stacking port when stacking two of the Conext SW?

      Product Line:
      Conext SW

      Environment:
      System with two of the Conext SW inverter stacked in parallel

      Resolution:
      The stacking port is inactive and unnecessary for stacked Conext SW systems. Make sure the Xanbus ports are properly configured and there's a connection between the two units before starting them.

      Cause:
      Purpose of stacking port isn't fully explained in the CSW manual

      Standard Lens Specifications for the WallBotz 500 & version 1 Camera Pod 120

      Issue:

      Standard Lens Specifications for the WallBotz 500 & version 1 Camera Pod 120

      Product Line:

      NetBotz

      Environment:

      NetBotz camera pod NBPD0121

      Cause:

      Lens specifications.

      Resolution:

      Lens Specifications for the standard lens on the WallBotz 500 / Camera Pod 120:

      Manufacturer: Marshall Electronics

      Model: V-4508

      Size: 1/2 inch format

      Focal Length: 8mm
      Note: The focal length is the distance between the lens and the imager.

      F-Stop: 1.3
      Note: The f-stop affects depth of field, or how much is in focus in front of and behind the subject.

      Field of View (horizontal x vertical in degrees): 40x28

      What is the allowable voltage range for the Conext SW?

      Issue:
      Customer is looking for clear voltage limits for the Conext SW. Wants to avoid damaging the unit.

      Product Line:
      Conext SW Hybrid Inverter/Chargers (2524, 4024, 4048)

      Environment:
      Any Conext SW installation with an AC source

      Resolution:
      The unit will only run at 280VAC MAX. It might not qualify right at that limit either since fluctuations can trip it over. AC support will not work at such a high voltage. The inverter can't overcome the high grid. In non-operating mode, the inverter can withstand over 300V L-L.

      Cause:
      Customer may not be fully clear on AC voltage limits after reviewing spec sheet
      Stated: 95-135VAC, 170-270VAC

      How do I Distinguish Different Versions of 4000 Series Display Modules?

      Problem

      My transmitter comes with a label that states "Do not interchange display with other sensors", or "Do not install display on a different unit. This display is for 4012 and 4032s only" or "This display is for 4102 and 4203s only" How come I can no longer swap displays on my transmitters?
       

      Environment

      4000 Series Transmitters, SCADASense Transmitters
       

      Solution

      The original Invensys displays used by the 4000 Series product line have been discontinued. Investigation into the new displays found that modifications to the new Invensys displays were necessary when the displays were used with a 4299 SI (Sensor Interface) board. The displays must be unmodified to function with an Invensys SI board.

      Problems will arise if you try to connect an incorrect display to a 4000 Series Transmitter which is why we discourage swapping displays among transmitters.

      • Original Invensys displays with TRSS part number TBUM298016 will continue to work on all 4000 Series Transmitters
      • New Invensys Displays with TRSS part number TBUM298020 will work on all transmitters that contain an Invensys SI board (4012, 4032, 4202 and older 4102s built before October 2006)
      • New Invensys Displays with TRSS part number TBUM298021 or TBUM298022 will work on all transmitters that contain a 4299 SI board (4203 and 4102s built after October 2006)

      To determine if you have a 4299 SI board or an Inversys SI board, open the 4000 Series Configuration Software, find the transmitter then check Status/Information.

      Transmitters with a 4299 SI board will have a Sensor Software Version greater than 5.
       

      Transmitters with an Invensys SI board will have a Sensor Software Version less than 5.

       

      What can I expect if I have the wrong display on my transmitter?

      If you have a 4299 display connected to an Invensys SI board, the display will go blank shortly after power up. Cycling power to the transmiter will bring back the display, but only for a short while. With the display out, the transmitter will continue to read valid data that will be accesible via polling.

      If you have an Invensys display connected to a 4299 SI board, it will create invalid sensor readings (e.g. static pressure readings of 250,000 PSI. These invalid readings will also be reported to the flow computer or any other device polling the transmitter. Removing the display from the transmitter should allow the transmitter to read normal values again.
       

      How can I tell the displays apart?

      You can visually differentiate between the old and new style displays by looking at the back of the display (see attached pictures below). The PCB fills the display casing with the old style displays, and is more rectangular with the new style displays. The old style displays will work with any 4000 series product. The new style displays will flash a version string at power up like *LCDAT* .

      During the transition, a small number of new boards were modified with one of the connector pins cut for transmitters with the 4299 SI Board.

      Original Style Display
       


       

      Short Term Display (removed pin circled in red)


       

      New Style Display

      Transmitters with the Invensys SI board can work with:

      • Original style display
      • New style display with version string *LCDAT* , *LCDAU* or *LCDAV*

      Transmitters with the 4299 SI board can work with:

      • Original style display
      • New style display with version string *LCDAW*
      • New style display with cut pin and version string *LCDAT* , *LCDAU* or *LCDAV*

       

      PowerChute Business Edition server installation hangs while trying to create the server service when no network is configured or present on Windows OS.

      Issue:
      PowerChute Business Edition Server installation hangs while trying to create the server service when no network is configured or present on Windows OS.

      Product Line:
      PowerChute Business Edition Server

      Environment:
      All supported Windows OS

      Cause:
      No configured network on the system

      Solution:
      1. If not done at the time of installation configure your network or enable the network to allow the installation to proceed.

      Note:  
      If this does not address the issue the PCBE Server will need to be reinstalled. Before reinstalling the PCBE Server complete the following steps will need to be completed:
       
      a. Terminate the Installation process by going into Task Manager and stopping the PCBE installation application.
      b. Go to the Registry and select 'Computer', then search for PowerChute and delete any keys containing PowerChute.
      Warning:  Editing the Registry incorrectly can cause serious system wide problems that may require you to reinstall Windows to correct them.  APC and Microsoft can not guarantee that any problems resulting from editing the Registry can be solved.
      c. In the Registry, select 'Computer, then search for any keys containing APCPBEServer. Both of these keys should be deleted completely not just the branches.
      d. Then reboot the PC.

      What is the breakdown of components for 9001KYK117?

      Issue:
      What is the breakdown of components for 9001KYK117?  

      Product Line:
      Harmony Push Buttons

      Environment:
      Harmony Control Stations

      Cause:
      Product Features

      Resolution:
      9001KYK117 components are:
      1-9001KY1S1 (red enclosure)
      1-9001K15 (break glass operator)
      1-9001KA1 (1 open and 1 closed contact)
      1-9001KN799RP (legend plate)

      Replacement glass discs are 9001K57 (package of five)
       

      Cable Picture Degradation When Using an APC Coaxial Surge Protector

      Issue:

      After connecting an APC device with Coax Protection, customer observes picture degradation or loss of digital channels.

      Product Line:

      SurgeArrest, Protectnet, Back-UPS, Back-UPS Pro, APC AV line of products

      Environment:

      Standard dB available to a home is 14 dB. Most television tuners require 7 dB

      to get a picture. Therefore, if one has a VCR and TV with coax cable between

      them, then 7 dB is all that is left for both. If one also has a FM receiver

      connected which requires 4 dB, the chances of 'ghosting' or lines being present

      are higher. Several cable subscribers have opted to split their cable

      connection so they can have a TV in the living room and the bedroom for

      example. Cable deregulation allowed customers to do this, but the cable

      company will not boost the signal to compensate unless they are informed by to

      do so. The customer would be billed for the boosted signal. The end result is

      a serious degradation of the signal. Inserting a cable protector like an APC

      Per3C, Per7C, or Pro8TV would cause a slight, additional dB loss. The signal

      has now degraded to the point where any magnetic interference could propagate

      into the cable signal."


      Cause / Resolution:

      APC Coax protection has been tested from 30 MHz to 1 GHz.
      It's insertion loss is at 1 GHz were attenuation is 5 dB.
      Over most of this frequency range, the insertion loss is ~ 1 dB

      1. Check all cable ""F"" Connectors for proper crimping. Buy pre-cut and

      terminated cables from an electronics store; such as Radio Shack.



      2. Use a 50 ohm terminator for any exposed non-connected female connectors

      (available at many electronics stores).



      3. Purchase a cable signal booster (boosts cable signal to around 20-24 dB).



      4. Inform their local cable provider that they are splitting and pay for an

      extra connection. A cable company can boost a signal. It is a cleaner way to

      go rather than using a booster.




       

      Starting Register number in Modbus Read functions

      Goals and Symptoms

      When performing Modbus read commands, it is important to apply the right starting register address in the read function. Otherwise, the wrong register will be accessed from the meter, giving unexpected data for the meter parameter being read.


      • Meter is functioning as expected. The front panel values for voltages and currents are within expected ranges for the system being monitored. However, modbus read functions from a master station (e.g. a PLC) give values that do not correspond to the front panel values.

      Facts and Changes

      Modbus, modbus rtu, function read, modbus map, holding register, staring register, function 03, modbus read packet

      Causes and Fixes

      Cause
      One probable cause would be that, the modbus function read command is not pointing to the right registers. The modbus protocol requires an offset to be introduced in the starting register address when reading the slaves register.

      Resolution

      When reading the meter parameters, the Master must send the device a Read Holding Registers packet. This packet must specify a start register and the number of registers to read. When the function read is received, the slave responds with a packet containing the registers in the range defined in the read request.

      However, consider the 3710 Modbus map, which states that according to the MODBUS protocol, in response to a request for address 4xxxx, the master reads register xxxx-1 from the slave (3710). For example, a request for register 40011 returns register 10 from the slave.

      What does the above statement mean? Why is an offset required?

      Holding registers, by default, are defined the 4xxxx range, the first holding register staring at 40001. The starting register in the read packet is, on the other hand, numbered from zero. Hence, the start register zero automatically points to holding register 40001, starting register one points to holding register 40002, etc. The fact that the first holding register is 40001 and not 40000 explains the offset that needs to be introduced in the starting register number.

      Hence, considering the 3710 Modbus Map statement, if the Master needs to read register 40011, then the corresponding starting register that needs to be put in the read function would be 10 (0A hex) since register 40011 is the register 10 from the first holding register, 40001:
      40001 > Start register 0
      40002 > Start register 1
      40003 > Start register 2
      40004 > Start register 3
      40005 > Start register 4
      40006 > Start register 5
      40007 > Start register 6
      40008 > Start register 7
      40009 > Start register 8
      40010 > Start register 9
      40011 > Start register 10

      The Modbus Read Request Packet for a master reading 3 registers from a slave with unit ID 100 (64 Hex) and for starting register of 40011 should be:
       

      Slave ID
      Function
      Start Register (40011)
      # of Registers
      CRC Checksum
      64
      03
      00
      0A
      00032C3C


      To summarize, when looking at a modbus map, the starting register number to be used in the read function:

      Start Register = Modbus Register 40001.

       

      Original article#12774

      Public

      All content © 1992-2007 Schneider Electric


      Legacy KB System (APS) Data: RESL188799 V1.0, Originally authored by KBAdPM on 11/03/2007, Last Edited by KBAdPM on 11/03/2007
      Related ranges: Modbus / JBus

      Are EasyPact MVS circuit breakers for sale in the USA or Canada?

      Issue:
      Where can I buy a EasyPact MVS breaker?

      Product Line:
      EasyPact MVS circuit breakers

      Resolution:
      There are no plans for a general release of the EasyPact MVS circuit breaker line in the US.
       

      Accutech Modbus Register Mapping

      Modbus RTU protocol is supported on the BR10 and BR20 Base Radios. Transmission rates of 9600, 19200, 38400, 57600, 115200 are supported with even, odd or no parity, 8 data bits and 1 or 2 stop bits. The Modbus settings are configured by using the push buttons on the base radio only. The BR10 contains 1 RS-485 port for Modbus communications. The BR20 contains 1 RJ45 connection called the "Short Haul Data" port. This port can be configured for 2-wire RS-485 or 3-wire RS-232 by a dipswich next to the serial port.

      The following menu items are used to configure Modbus in the base radio via the push buttons. For a complete menu map of all Accutech Instruments, please reference the Accutech Wireless User Manual that is installed along with Accutech Manager Software an your PC.

      BAUD RT - Baud Rate
      DEV ID - Modbus Device ID
      PARITY - Parity
      STOPB - Stob bit selection
      MODMAP - Register mapping options (see below)
      MODADR - Modbus address of base radio
      ORDER - Floating point word order

      There are two user options to determine Modbus mapping in the base radio/field units. The MODMAP configuration determines if the mapping will be DEV mode (Device ID) or REG mode (Register)

      Device ID Mode

      • Poll for individual devices (Base Radio and Field Units)
      • Modbus Station ID = Base Radio Modbus Station Address + Field Unit RF ID
      • Modbus starting register = 40001

      Register Mode

      • Poll single Modbus station ID for complete Accutech network
      • Modbus Station ID = Base Radio Modbus Station Address
      • Field unit Modbus address are multiples of their RF ID
      • Modbus starting register = (Field Unit RF ID * 10) + 40001

      Base Radio Registers

      Base Radio Holding Register (Device and Register Mapping Modes)

      Device ID: 1 To 247 Max.

      Address

      Description

      Register Type

      40001

      Base Radio Device Type

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40002

      Base Radio Device Status

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40003

      Number of Field Units Expected on the wireless network.

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40004

      Number of Field Units actually online in the wireless network.

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40005

      Online/Offline Status Of Field Units with RFIDs 1-16

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40006

      Online/Offline Status Of Field Units with RFIDs 17-32

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40007

      Online/Offline Status Of Field Units with RFIDs 33-48

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40008

      Online/Offline Status Of Field Units with RFIDs 49-50

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40009

      Diagnostic Counter (increments each second)

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

      40010

      Reserved For Future Use

      16-Bit Unsigned Integer

       

      Field Unit Holding Registers

      Field Unit operational data is stored in a sequential block of 10 Modbus registers in the Base Radio. The Modbus Station address and the actual register addresses will vary depending on the Modbus Mapping mode set in the base radio. The Modbus Station address and register locations are described below for each Mapping mode.

      Device ID Mapping Mode

      When DEVMODE is selected, the base radio stores the field unit and base radio operation data (10 Modbus holding registers) in separate Modbus Station addresses. In this mode, the SCADA Host (Modbus Master) needs to send an individual poll request for each field units data and the base radio data. Station addresses are determined using Base Radio Device ID parameter and the Field Units RFID parameter. This mode is suitable for systems using a template for each field unit.

      Field Unit Modbus Station Address = Base Radio Device ID + Field Unit RFID

      Field Unit Holding Register Addresses

      Field Unit Register Description

      Register Type

      40001 and 40002

      Device Type

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40003 and 40004

      Device Status

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40005 and 40006

      Primary Sensor Value2

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40007 and 40008

      Secondary Sensor Value2

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40009 and 40010

      Tertiary Sensor Value2

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      1The default floating point format for Modbus database registers is Low Word, High Word. For example if a floating point value is in registers 40001 and 40002 then 40001 is the low word and 40002 is the high word. For SCADAPack controllers 40001 is the high word and 40002 is the low word. The floating point word order is decided by Modbus Floating Point Order of base radio Modbus Communication Configuration.

      2Any field unit that is currently offline will return NaN (Not a Number) when queried for its primary, secondary or tertiary measurement value. If a field unit is online, NaN will also be returned for measurement values that do not exist in the device. For example, a field unit providing one measurement will return NaN for its secondary and tertiary values.

      Register Mapping Mode

       When REGMODE is selected, the base radio stores the field unit and base radio operation data (10 Modbus holding registers) in sequential blocks of registers located at a single Modbus Station address. The base radio uses register addresses 1 through 10 with subsequent groups of 10 registers used by each field unit. Station address is determined by the base radio Device ID and the Register addresses for each field unit are offset from the base radio registers by a factor of 10 times the field unit RFID parameter. This mode is suitable for a system that wants to poll for multiple field unit devices at once.

      Field Unit Modbus Station Address = Base Radio Device ID

      Field Unit Holding Register Addresses

      Field Unit Register Description

      Register Type

      40001 + (RFID * 10) and 40002 + (RFID * 10)

      Device Type (see list below)

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40003 + (RFID * 10) and 40004 + (RFID * 10)

      Device Status (see list below)

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40005 + (RFID * 10) and 40006 + (RFID * 10)

      Primary Sensor Value2

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40007 + (RFID * 10) and 40008 + (RFID * 10)

      Secondary Sensor Value2

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

      40009 + (RFID * 10) and 40010 + (RFID * 10)

      Tertiary Sensor Value2

      Two Modbus registers formatted as a 32-Bit IEEE Floating Point1

       

      1The default floating point format for Modbus database registers is Low Word, High Word. For example if a floating point value is in registers 40001 and 40002 then 40001 is the low word and 40002 is the high word. For SCADAPack controllers 40001 is the high word and 40002 is the low word. The floating point word order is decided by Modbus Floating Point Order of base radio Modbus Communication Configuration.

      2Any field unit that is currently offline will return NaN (Not a Number) when queried for its primary, secondary or tertiary measurement value. If a field unit is online, NaN will also be returned for measurement values that do not exist in the device. For example, a field unit providing one measurement will return NaN for its secondary and tertiary values.