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switch plate 3 pos pad print

39

Flush Switch, 1 Gang, 250VAC, 10A, Architrave, 3 Position

switch plate 3 pos pad print
Colour: White Electric
Colour: Per UOM Std.
  • White Electric 1 PCE
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Key Features & Specifications

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  • Architrave Size flush switch
  • 3 position low/off /high switch
  • 75 mm Length x 32 mm Width x 10 mm Depth
  • 55 mm apart Mounting centres
Range of product
Standard Series
Product brand
Clipsal
Device presentation
basic element with full cover plate
Switch function
  • 2-way
  • 1-way
    • Actuator
      rocker
      Number of rocker
      1
      Device mounting
      flush
      Local signalling
      without
      [Ue] rated operational voltage
      250 V AC
      Rated current
      10 A
      Marking
      without marking
      REACh Regulation
      Reference contains Substances of Very High Concern above the threshold
      EU RoHS Directive
      Compliant
      Mercury free
      Yes
      RoHS exemption information
      Yes
      China RoHS Regulation
      Product out of China RoHS scope. Substance declaration for your information
      Circularity Profile
      N/A

      Documents & downloads

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      • All

      • Product Brochures

      • CAD Files and Packs

      • Technical Data Catalogues

      • Installation Instruction

      • Product Environmental

      • Specifications

      • Case Studies

      • Certificates (MSDS)

      Frequently Asked Questions

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      What is the part number for a 39 Series mech labelled up and down?

      The part number for a 39 Series mech labelled up and down is 39MUOD.

      Can I have the data sheet for OW3816?

      This is an Obsolete product.

      please refer to Page 39 on the following document for technical specs>

      https://updates.clipsal.com/ClipsalOnline/Files/Brochures/A0000287.pdf

      Does the ATS48 soft starter remember the motor thermal sate through a power cycle?

      ISSUE:
      Does the ATS48 soft starter remember the motor thermal sate through a power cycle?

      PRODUCT LINE:
      ATS48 series soft starters

      ENVIRONMENT:
      All models, All serial numbers.

      CAUSE:
      Clarification of product features needed.

      RESOLUTION:
      Yes.  Per page 39 of the instruction bulletin, document # S1A37491 01/2010:

      "The ATS48 controller is a UL Listed motor controller with integrated motor
      and controller thermal protection. The motor and controller temperature are
      continuously calculated based on the controller nominal current and the
      current that is actually drawn. An electronic circuit, which stores the thermal
      state of the motor even if the supply power is disconnected, simulates the
      cooling curve."

      What are the replacement contacts and diaphragm part numbers for a 9013FHG/FSG pressure switch?

      Issue:
      9013F** pressure switch repair kit

      Product Line:
      Commercial Pressure Switches

      Environment:
      Type F—Pumptrol™ Water Pump Pressure Switches

      Resolution:
      For standard (non-special) devices:
      • Types FHG2 thru 19 order 9998 PC241.
      • Types FHG22 thru 39 order 9998 PC242.
      • Types FHG42 thru49 order 9998 PC241.
      • Types FHG52 thru 59 order 9998 PC242.
      For all Type FSG devices: 
      • Order 9998 PC241.  

      Note: the diaphragm comes with the replacement contacts.

      My Back-UPS emits a clicking sound, yet functions properly

      Issue:

      My Back-UPS emits a clicking sound, yet functions properly.

      Product Line:

      Back-UPS and Back-UPS PRO

      Environment:

      N/A

      Cause:

      The relay inside the UPS may be audible in some environments. The relay switches when Intelligent Battery Management features such as Boost and Trim are initiated and when the UPS switches to battery. This is proper operation of the UPS. 

      Resolution:

      Boost and Trim are Automatic Voltage Regulation features where the UPS will either boost or trim the power to protect brownout or overvoltage conditions respectively. Boost or Trim can last as long or short as the brownout or overvoltage condition will last. If the clicking becomes frequent, there may be issues with incoming power. Please contact techical support for further assistance.
       

      The maximum values for Outlet Group Off delay and Minimum Return Runtime are inconsistent between the UPS LCD and PowerChute Business Edition Agent 9.0, 9.0.1, 9.1.0, 9.1.1, 9.2.0, and 9.2.1

      Issue:
      Outlet Group Off delay and Minimum Return Runtime cannot be set to values greater than 9999 in PowerChute Business Edition Agent, yet values for the same fields can be set to greater than 9999 on the UPS LCD.

      Product Line:
      PowerChute Business Edition versions 9.0, 9.0.1, 9.1.0, 9.1.1, 9.2.0, 9.2.1

      Environment:
      OS: Linux, Solaris, Windows x64, x86.

      Cause:
      An upper limit of 9999 seconds (2 Hours, 46 mins and 39 secs) has been set in PowerChute Business Edition Agent for the Outlet Group Off delay and Minimum Return Runtime. An upper limit of 32767 is available in the UPS LCD for these fields.

      Solution:
      Use a value less than or equal to 9999 when setting an Outlet Group Off delay and Minimum Return Runtime field directly on the UPS LCD.
       

      Matrix-UPS run time theory

      Issue:
      Where can information be found on the method the Matrix UPS calculates its estimated runtime?

      Product Line:
      Matrix UPS

      Environment:
      All serial ranges

      Cause:
      This information may be required during routine troubleshooting.

      Resolution:

      The software algorithm on the Matrix UPS calculates the "Estimated Run Time" based on five variables:

      1. Age of the batteries
      2. Type of battery (lead acid)
      3. Number of battery packs
      4. Type of battery packs (i.e. SmartCell or SmartCell XR)
      5. Percentage of load being applied to the UPS.

      When a fully charged battery begins to discharge (with a good size load) initially its voltage drops off rapidly. After a short time the voltage levels off for a while, ramps down steadily then drops off rapidly once again when the battery capacity is almost used. To allow the UPS to predict when the battery will be exhausted (39 VDC) it stores four numbers which represent a typical discharge curve (constants). By knowing where it is in the discharge curve, the UPS will be able to estimate the remaining run time. Three of the four battery constants are set depending on the battery type (i.e. lead acid). The fourth constant (bottom of the curve) is set after a deep discharge or by performing a run time calibration.

      A calibration might establish that at 40 volts DC the batteries are 2 minutes from reaching 39 volts (which is always the end of discharge). As the batteries age, the 2 minutes to shutdown point will climb the discharge curve to a much higher value and the estimated run time displayed will be decreased accordingly.

      If the UPS load is too light compared to the number of battery packs, you will observe that when the UPS is on-battery, the estimated run time will freeze since the battery voltage does not ramp down rapidly enough to cross over the set points in the discharge curve.

      The estimated run time can also be inaccurate if there is a miscalibration of the fourth battery constant. When the UPS is first installed with a brand new set of batteries, this constant is set to a Hexadecimal value of "B0". To the algorithm this represents a battery that is brand new and should follow a normal curve. If the constant is too low (below "80" Hex) the UPS might begin a graceful shutdown too soon or show an abnormally short run time.

      Conclusion:

      Battery run time estimation is not an exact science. There could be as much as 30% error (on a good calibration). To minimize the inaccuracy on the run time display please refer to the KBase document titled "Requirements for Matrix UPS "Run Time Calibration"


      How to read alarm status's via registers on a CM3000/CM4000 series meter

      Issue
      Reading alarm registers

      Product Line
      CM3000
      CM4000

      Environment
      Alarming

      Resolution
      Register 10011 - 10022 (12) contain the active alarm status for all alarms in a Series 4000 or 3000 Circuit Monitor (CM3, CM4). The least significant register is 10022 and 10011 is the most significant register. Therefore, register 10022 contain the status of the first 16 alarms. In binary, the least significant bit (referred to as bit 00) to the right of the register represents alarm 1, bit 01 = alarm 2, bit 02 = alarm 3, and ...........

      1 = alarm is active
      0 = alarm is inactive

      Example:.
      Alarm 2 and 4 are active (bits 01 and 03)
      register 10022 reads 0000000000001010 in binary


      Alarm Description
      01 Over Current Phase A Over Ia 
      02 Over Current Phase B Over Ib 
      03 Over Current Phase C Over Ic 
      04 Over Current Neutral Over In 
      05 Over Current Ground Over Ig 
      06 Under Current Phase A Under Ia 
      07 Under Current Phase B Under Ib 
      08 Under Current Phase C Under Ic 
      09 Current Unbalance, Max I Unbal Max 
      10 Current Loss Current Loss 
      11 Over Voltage Phase AN Over Van 
      12 Over Voltage Phase BN Over Vbn 
      13 Over Voltage Phase CN Over Vcn 
      14 Over Voltage Phase AB Over Vab 
      15 Over Voltage Phase BC Over Vbc 
      16 Over Voltage Phase CA Over Vca 
      17 Under Voltage Phase A Under Van 
      18 Under Voltage Phase B Under Vbn 
      19 Under Voltage Phase C Under Vcn 
      20 Under Voltage Phase AB Under Vab 
      21 Under Voltage Phase BC Under Vbc 
      22 Under Voltage Phase CA Under Vca 
      23 Voltage Unbalance LN, Max V Unbal L-N Max 
      24 Voltage Unbalance LL, Max V Unbal L-L Max 
      25 Voltage Loss (loss of A,B,C, but not all) Voltage Loss 
      26 Phase Reversal Phase Rev 
      27 Over kVA Demand Over kVA Dmd 
      28 Over kW Demand Over kW Dmd 
      29 Over kVAR Demand Over kVAR Dmd 
      30 Over Frequency Over Freq 
      31 Under Frequency Under Freq 
      32 Lagging true power factor Lag True PF 
      33 Leading true power factor Lead True PF 
      34 Lagging displacement power factor Lag Disp PF 
      35 Leading displacement power factor Lead Disp PF 
      36 Over Current Demand Phase A Over Ia Dmd 
      37 Over Current Demand Phase B Over Ib Dmd 
      38 Over Current Demand Phase C Over Ic Dmd 
      39 Over THD Voltage AN Over THD Van 
      40 Over THD Voltage BN Over THD Vbn 
      41 Over THD Voltage CN Over THD Vcn 
      42 Over THD Voltage AB Over THD Vab 
      43 Over THD Voltage BC Over THD Vbc 
      44 Over THD Voltage CA Over THD Vca 
      45-80 Reserved for custom alarms.

       

      How to read alarm status's via registers on a CM2000 series meter

      The alarm status's are stored in registers 5771-5778 with each alarm set to a bit indexed from zero. For example, if one needed to determine if the over current alarm for phase A was active you would read register 5771 and look to bit zero. If the register reading program is not capable of displaying binary (bit level) information, the information may be entered into the Windows calculator and converted from decimal to binary.
      Alarm No. Alarm Description
      01 Over Current Phase A
      02 Over Current Phase B
      03 Over Current Phase C
      04 Over Current Neutral
      05 Over Current Ground
      06 Under Current Phase A
      07 Under Current Phase B
      08 Under Current Phase C
      09 Current Unbalance Phase A
      10 Current Unbalance Phase B
      11 Current Unbalance Phase C
      12 Phase Loss, Current
      13 Over Voltage Phase A
      14 Over Voltage Phase B
      15 Over Voltage Phase C
      16 Over Voltage Phase A-B
      17 Over Voltage Phase B-C
      18 Over Voltage Phase C-A
      19 Under Voltage Phase A
      20 Under Voltage Phase B
      21 Under Voltage Phase C
      22 Under Voltage Phase A-B
      23 Under Voltage Phase B-C
      24 Under Voltage Phase C-A
      25 Voltage Unbalance A
      26 Voltage Unbalance B
      27 Voltage Unbalance C
      28 Voltage Unbalance A-B
      29 Voltage Unbalance B-C
      30 Voltage Unbalance C-A
      31 Voltage Loss (Loss of A, B, or C, but not all)
      32 Over kVA 3-Phase Total
      33 Over KW Into the Load 3-Phase Total
      34 Over KW Out of the Load 3-Phase Total
      35 Over kVAR Into the Load 3-Phase Total
      36 Over kVAR Out of the Load 3-Phase Total
      37 Over Current Demand Phase A
      38 Over Current Demand Phase B
      39 Over Current Demand Phase C
      40 Over Current Demand 3-phase Total
      41 Over Frequency
      42 Under Frequency
      43 Lagging True Power Factor
      44 Leading True Power Factor
      45 Lagging Displacement Power Factor
      46 Leading Displacement Power Factor
      47 Suspended Sag/Swell
      49 Over Value THD Current Phase A
      50 Over Value THD Current Phase B
      51 Over Value THD Current Phase C
      52 Over Value THD Voltage Phase A-N
      53 Over Value THD Voltage Phase B-N
      54 Over Value THD Voltage Phase C-N
      55 Over Value THD Voltage Phase A-B
      56 Over Value THD Voltage Phase B-C
      57 Over Value THD Voltage Phase C-A
      58 Over K-Factor Phase A 1071 Tenths % A
      59 Over K-Factor Phase B 1072 Tenths % A
      60 Over K-Factor Phase C
      61 Over Predicted kVA Demand
      62 Over Predicted KW Demand
      63 Over Predicted kVAR Demand
      64 Over kVA Demand Level 1
      65 Over kVA Demand Level 2
      66 Over kVA Demand Level 3
      67 Over kW Demand Level 1
      68 Over KW Demand Level 2
      69 Over KW Demand Level 3
      70 Over kVAR Demand
      71 Over Lagging 3-phase Avg. Power Factor
      72 Under 3-Phase Total Real Power
      73 Over Reverse 3-Phase Power
      74 Phase Reversal
      75 Status Input 1 Transition from Off to On
      76 Status Input 2 Transition from Off to On
      77 Status Input 3 Transition from Off to On
      78 Status Input 4 Transition from Off to On
      79 Status Input 5 Transition from Off to On
      80 Status Input 6 Transition from Off to On
      81 Status Input 7 Transition from Off to On
      82 Status Input 8 Transition from Off to On
      83 Status Input 1 Transition from On to Off
      84 Status Input 2 Transition from On to Off
      85 Status Input 3 Transition from On to Off
      86 Status Input 4 Transition from On to Off
      87 Status Input 5 Transition from On to Off
      88 Status Input 6 Transition from On to Off
      89 Status Input 7 Transition from On to Off
      90 Status Input 8 Transition from On to Off
      99 End of Incremental Energy Interval
      100 Power-Up/Reset
      101 End of Demand Interval
      102 End of Update Cycle
      103 Over Analog Input Channel 1
      104 Over Analog Input Channel 2
      105 Over Analog Input Channel 3
      106 Over Analog Input Channel 4
      107 Under Analog Input Channel 1
      108 Under Analog Input Channel 2
      109 Under Analog Input Channel 3
      110 Under Analog Input Channel 4
      201 Voltage Swell A-N/A-B
      202 Voltage Swell B-N
      203 Voltage Swell C-N/C-B
      204 Current Swell Phase A
      205 Current Swell Phase B
      206 Current Swell Phase C
      207 Current Swell Neutral
      208 Voltage Sag A-N/A-B
      209 Voltage Sag B-N
      210 Voltage Sag C-N/C-B
      211 Current Sag Phase A
      212 Current Sag Phase B
      213 Current Sag Phase C
      214 Current Sag Neutral


      Legacy KB System (APS) Data: RESL209554 V1.0, Originally authored by MaTh on 11/02/2012, Last Edited by MaTh on 11/02/2012
      Related ranges: CM2000 series